The Effectiveness of PBL Problems from Students and Tutors Perspectives

https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.25364

Savitri Shitarukmi(1*), Siti Rokhmah Projosasmito(2), Herma Roebertsen(3)

(1) Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada - Indonesia
(2) Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada - Indonesia
(3) Department of Educational Development and Research, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Science, Maastricht University - The Netherlands
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


Background: PBL problems are used as a starting point to students in attaining learning objectives. Students are expected to discuss the problems according the principles of collaborative learning, constructive learning, contextual learning, and self-directed learning. A continuous monitoring, evaluating, and improving the PBL problems should be done systematically. Nevertheless, the problems are lacking monitoring and evaluation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL problem by providing an evaluation tool. The evaluation involved students and tutors.

Method: A survey by using questionnaire based on six factors of an effective PBL problem was conducted to obtain students and tutors perception towards the effectiveness of 6 PBL problems used in tutorial session. The questionnaire for each scenario distributed to four randomly selected group tutorials (total samples per scenario is 40 students and four tutors). The perceptions were then analysed by using descriptive statistic. Four open ended questions included in the questionnaire were used to get better understanding and explanation of quantitative result.

Results: A total of 198 (82.5% response rate) students and 23 (95% response rate) tutors filled the questionnaire. Students and tutors gave their score for the overall quality of each PBL problems. Some differences among students and tutors in rating the overall quality on each problem were found. The strength and the weakness of each problem were also obtained from students’ and tutors’ rate for the six factors in the questionnaire. Each group of participants had their own concern regarding the most important factor for an effective PBL problem.

Conclusion: The result of this evaluation could reflect the effectiveness of PBL problems in achieving students’ learning objectives from different viewpoints: students and tutors. This valuable information can be used by problem designers and their institutions to monitor and improve the quality of PBL problems continuously.

 


Keywords


Evaluation, PBL, PBL problem, tutor, student

Full Text:

PDF


References

  1. Dolmans D, Snellen-Balendong H. Problem construction. Maastricht: Department of Educational Development and Research; 2002.
  2. Das M, Mpofu DJS, Hasan MY, Stewart TS. Students perceptions of tutor skills in poblem-based learning tutorials. Med Educ, 2002;36:272-8.
  3. Schmidt H, Moust J. Designing Problems. In Berkel HV, Scherpbier A, Hillen H, van der Vleuten CPM (Eds.). Lessons from Problem-based Learning. Auckland: Oxford University Press; 2010:31-45.
  4. Munshi FM, Zayat ESAE, Dolmans DH. Development and utility of a questionnaire to evaluate the quality of PBL problems. South East Asian Journal of Medical Education, 2008;2, 32-40.
  5. Dolmans D, Schmidt H. The Problem-based Learning Process. In Berkel HV, Scherpbier A, Hillen H, van der Vleuten CPM (Eds.). Lessons from Problem-based Learning. Auckland: Oxford University Press; 2010:13-20.
  6. Schmidt H, Moust J. Designing Problems. In Berkel HV, Scherpbier A, Hillen H, van der Vleuten CPM (Eds.). Lessons from Problem-based Learning. Auckland: Oxford University Press; 2010:31-45.
  7. Wood FD. ABC of learning and teaching in medicine: Problem-based learning. British Medical Journal, 2003;326:328-30.
  8. Moust J, Roebertsen H. Alternative Instructional Problem-based Learning Formats. In Berkel HV, Scherpbier A, Hillen H, van der Vleuten CPM (Eds.). Lessons from Problem-based Learning. Auckland: Oxford University Press; 2010:129-41.
  9. Azer S. Navigating Problem-based Learning. Sydney: Churchill Livingstone; 2008.
  10. Richards L. Handling qualitative data: a practical guide. London: Sage Publication; 2009.
  11. Davis MH, Harden RM. AMEE Medical Education Guide No. 15: Problem-based learning: a practical guide. Med Teach, 1999;21:130-40.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.25364

Article Metrics

Abstract views : 3102 | views : 2733

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2017 Savitri Shitarukmi, Siti Rokhmah Projosasmito, Herma Roebertsen

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Jurnal Pendidikan Kedokteran Indonesia (The Indonesian Journal of Medical Education) indexed by:

 

JPKI Stats