COMPARING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LED TV/LCD AND WHITEBOARD AS A LEARNING MEDIA IN PBL TUTORIAL DISCUSSION IN A MEDICAL SCHOOL AT INDONESIA

https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.46410

Prattama Santoso Utomo(1*), Savitri Shitarukmi(2), Noviarina Kurniawati(3), Widyandana Widyandana(4)

(1) Department of Medical Education Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada
(2) Department of Medical Education and Bioethics Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing Universitas Gadjah Mada
(3) Department of Medical Education and Bioethics Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing Universitas Gadjah Mada
(4) Department of Medical Education and Bioethics Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing Universitas Gadjah Mada
(*) Corresponding Author

Abstract


Background: Learning media do have an important role in facilitating learning for medical students, especially in Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum. TV-LEDs, LCDs and whiteboards are currently popular to be used as the learning media for PBL tutorial discussions. TV-LEDs and LCDs are digital technologies which are considered more sophisticated when compared to whiteboards. Undergraduate medical students in Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (FM UGM), Yogyakarta-Indonesia attend PBL tutorials every week and use those learning media to facilitate their tutorial discussions. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of TV-LEDs/LCDs and whiteboards as learning media in PBL tutorial discussion.

Methods: A cross-sectional study using both qualitative and quantitative (mixed method) survey approaches. A total of 398 third and fourth year undergraduate medical students of FM UGM participated the survey. Data were collected using a questionnaire that incorporated close-ended questions using likert-scale (quantitative) and open-ended questions (qualitative). Quantitative data were analysed based in ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) grouping method and qualitative data were analysed using deductive qualitative analysis.

Results: The survey found based on ARCS groups that A = 3,68; R = 3,63; C = 3,69; S = 3,71. These results indicate that students are eager and enthusiastic in using the technology of TV-LEDs/LCDs as learning media. The qualitative responses describe the benefits and limitations of both TV-LEDs/LCDs and whiteboards as learning media in PBL tutorial. Students also provide some suggestions to optimise the benefits of both learning medias in facilitating learning in PBL tutorial.

Conclusion: The use of TV-LEDs/LCDs as learning media in PBL tutorial received a positive response overall. TV-LEDs/LCDs are considered more effective and interactive rather than whiteboard. Students suggested that TV-LEDs/LCDs should be used side-by-side with whiteboard.

Keywords: TV-LED/LCD, whiteboard, tutorial, learning media, effectiveness, medical student


Keywords


TV-LED/LCD, whiteboard, tutorial, learning media, effectiveness, medical student

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.22146/jpki.46410

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